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This page is in production. I will add sections as completed
    Neil


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 1 - Bradford on Avon to Dilton Marsh

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You start by the Kennet and Avon on the edge of the town to climb briefly towards Westwood. Westwood is a pretty village and contains Westwood Manor which is managed by the National Trust and opens in the summer. Onto a narrow lane which descends steeply towards an A Road, but take the descent slowly as just after the lane descends a World War 2 bunker can be visited on the left. With a narrow entrance it gave views across the valley. Take care at the bottom of the hill as the next section is a little busier heading along the A366. However you will pass a castle of the right. Well I say castle, it is in fact afortified residence from the 14th century and it is possible to cycle through it, but you need to pay an admission to view the chapel. You are into open countryside now with a rolling lane that takes you to the outskirts of Rode, however take a moment to have a look at the pretty village of Tellisford and its church. Reaching Rode, there is a good pub at the Mill  before you enter the village. The Wiltshire Cycleway passes through but it is worth heading left opposite the pub to explore the centre  and visit the shop Leaving Rode you'll head left towards the crossing of the A361. Please take care here, it's a busy road, but there are good lines of sight. The Cycleway now follows lanes as it winds its way past small farms, many of which are grazing for horses. At Rudge there is an excellent pub  before more flat lanes take you to Brokerswood. As you turn left don't miss the green galvanised church which still holds services. The final section takes you to Dilton Marsh where this section finishes at the mini roundabout to the east of the village. There is even a railway station should you wish to use the train for your journey home.


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 2 - Dilton Marsh to Maiden Bradley

Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 2 - Pictures
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Starting at the eastern end of Dilton Marsh, very close to the railway station, you set of along a dead end road passing a baptist chapel to cross the road at a purpose built crossing to climb Tower Hill towards Chapmanslade. This initial climb is quite busy, so be careful. At Chapmanslade you head left and descend passing the pretty church at Corsley and a pub where you can buy fresh milk from a vending machine. Climbing to the main village of Corsley, the Wiltshire Cycleway descends again through Whitbourne Moor heading for the Longleat Estate passing another interesting church on the right. Lord Bath has allowed you to cycle right through the Longleat Estate, so you will pass the enclosures viewing giraffes and zebras and may even hear the roar of the lions. Longleat House is very impressive and you pass right by it, after which you head out to Horningsham via the main driveway for a final climb to finish at Maiden Bradley. Take time here to check out the ornamental horse trough to the left in the village
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Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 3 - Maiden Bradley to Mere

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Starting at Maiden Bradley you head through open countryside towards the village of Kilmington that is strung out along the lanes. This section is gradually downhill and you glide towards Stourton which is famous for it's fabulous gardens managed by the National Trust. The Wiltshire Cycleway bypasses this and takes in a busier road. A better way that is actually shorter takes you along a firm track (OK for road tyres) which passes the main house and takes you past the main entrance where you can access a cafe and toilets without admission. Onwards where the views open out across huge fields to views the hills in the distance. On the edge of Zeals you'll pass an old airfield marked by a house conversion. Into Zeals where you head left, but take time to go right and visit the pub or pretty church. The final section are through narrow lanes which wind there way to the edge of Mere where this section finishes. However it is worth heading left to explore this village that has many amenities including two shops and a cafe.


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 4 - Mere to Donhead St Mary

(Walnut Tree Inn to Church)

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You can start this ride from Mere, which is recommended. There are shops and plenty of parking, even a brown sign to the Walnut Inn which is the official start point. Passing the Walnut tree Inn, the road is mostly flat as it passes through farming country. Heading left you head towards East Knowle where you will pass the appropriately named Underhill because this is where the road starts to climb. The Wiltshire Cycleway goes right, but it's worth continuing up the hill because when you get to the top, you can turn left and after 100metres there is a windmill and seat on the right with a great view on the left. East Knoyle windmill was last used in 1896, but what remains is quite recognisable.
Returning to the Cycleway, you'll enter East Knoyle, birthplace of Sir Christopher Wren with a shop and large playground. You cross the busy A350 via a cyclepath (good visibility both ways) before following the lanes to Semley with an impressive church, a pub, a shop and teastop and an amazing old signpost. Onwards as the way gets a little lumpier but the climbs are short to finish at the small hamlet of Donhead St Mary.
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Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 5 - Donhead St Mary to Broad Chalke

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Starting by the church at Donhead St Mary, descend quite steeply to head left and then climb to follow the lane east towards Berwick St John. Care as you cross the A30 before cycling a delightful flattish lane to pass through Berwick and onto Alveston. Yu will pass througha glorious holloway lined by trees and admire several bits of topiary as you head onwards. In Alvediston there is a very pretty church and a thatched pub. The cycleway bypasses Ebbesbourne Wake but it is worth cycling through the village as it's a thatched pretty village and at the end is a pound where animals were stored that strayed many years ago. As you head to the finish there are extensive views and a simple chapel on the right that's worth a look. You finish in Broad Chalke where there is a lovely cafe. To continue just keep on heading east down the valley

Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 6 - Broad Chalke to Salisbury

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Starting from the Queen's Head in Broad Chalke the route heads east along a moderately busy road passing through Stoke Farthing and Bishopstone. As you cycle, don't miss the cycle orientated wind machines on the left as you pass through these extended villages. IMPORTANT As a writer I am not sure how this has happened but two separate Wiltshire Cycleways have developed into Salisbury. They both meet at Quidhampton, and both go over the ridge. The one here follows the original route and I feel is a better way to go. It's a lower at 138m to climb where the other is 170metres and is easier to follow. The traffic is maybe slightly busier (subjective) and the latter that goes through Wilton takes in an awful section along the A36 into Salisbury. This latter route has been marked up recently but many signs are missing.
So assuming you follow the original, the route climbs over the ridge to pass Salisbury racecourse. The climb is steeper at the start but does give good views on both sides. At the race course it descends into Netherhampton. Here is a busy section, so take care as this is used by cars to avoid the centre of Salisbury. It's not long but you'll go right along the traffic calmed route that follows the river Nadder as it enters Salisbury. It gets you surprisingly close, but gets busier again as you cycle straight with the railway on the left and Industrial estate on the right. At the roundabout it quietens and you are quickly into the centre of Salisbury. Please take time to explore Salisbury. You will see the Cathedral on the way in and the delightful High Street Gate leads you to a beautiful Square and the fabulous Cathedral
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Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 7 - Salisbury to Amesbury


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 8 - Amesbury to Everleigh


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 9 - Everleigh to Great Bedwyn

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This section of the Wiltshire Cycleway starts at Everleigh. The original instructions say the Crown Inn, but this has recently closed. It's still there and is painted green (may change) The marker is now a small stone that is a war memorial to the 1914-18 war and a seat round a tree. Hear right along the A342 that is quite quiet before heading left across the downs with expansive views of large agricultural fields. Descending to Collingbourne Ducis, you cross the A338 (pedestrian crossing LHS) pass a shop and cycle a traffic calmed lanes through the thatched cottages. Left at the Shears Inn (there are giraffes in the garden) to gradually climb for more views. The brick structure at the top on the left is a pumping house for the reservoir. Descend to the A388 to cross and head towards Wilton. There's a pub to the left off route, but a much better bet is to visit the windmill with a picnic or use the small cafe in the summer. Descend to cross the Kennet and Avon Canal and the railway that run west to east. Bear right and finish in Great Bedwyn, where you finish in the centre, but don't miss the post office and the amazing pieces the stonemason left including the Las Supper on the East Wall


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 10 - Great Bedwyn to Malborough

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This section of the Wiltshire Cycleway starts in the centre by the phone box (now an information centre). Head slightly uphill towards the Three Tuns pub where there is a good signpost punting to Little Bedwyn and you will pass the edge of this viewing the attractive church. Into open countryside that undulates towards the A4. You descend steeply to this main road having entered Froxfield where you are on this road very briefly before heading out of the village passing the church on the left. Into open countryside with wide-open views climbing through lanes. A 10% descent (or is it 17% if you look at the other sign at the bottom) takes you over the River Kennet and into the pretty village of Ramsbury, spread along the Kennet valley. Ramsbury has a pub, shop, a cafe in the British Legion (limited opening) a library and restrooms. The road to Marlborough follows the Kennet Valley with the only climb taking you around the big house that can just about be seen after you pass its impressive gatehouse. Through Axford and Mildenhall and into one of the larger towns on the Wiltshire Cycleway, Marlborough. Old timbered houses greet you and on the outskirts you can go straight on as bicycles are allowed but the route goes left then right and into the centre which boasts the widest High Street in England. There are plenty of cafes here along with clothes shops because this is quite a posh place but full of cars.
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Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 11 - Malborough to Clyffe Pypard


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 12 - Clyffe Pypard to Callow Hill


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 13 - Callow Hill to Malmesbury


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 14 - Malmesbury to Yatton Keynell


Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 15 - Yatton Keynell to Corsham

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Starting in Yatton Keynell, this section of the Wiltshire Cycleway is the shortest and probably the flattest as it heads through the arable landscape of the southern Cotswolds. It passes through Biddestone which is quintessentially English Cotswold with a central duck pond surrounded by lovely Cotswold stone buildings and a pub thrown in for good measure. After this a flattish lane leads to Corsham, which is a medium sized town. The Wiltshire Cycleway originally went close to the very pretty High Street, but for some reason has been signed missing this, so this route follows the original. Corsham is the home to Corsham Court, home of beautiful gardens and Elizabethan architecture. This section finishes opposite some impressive gates and an Alms House dating from the 17th century

Wiltshire Cycleway - Section 16 -  Corsham to Bradford on Avon

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This section of the Wiltshire Cycleway starts to the east of Corsham by the war memorial. Heading south you descend and climb, don't forget to look at the deep cutting of the railway line below. Entering open countryside you cycle small lanes as you head towards Atworth. On the outskirts you'll zig zag a main road but there is good visibility before passing through the old part of the village. Into open countryside again and you'll start to get good views to the south now. At Stonar school follow the very good signs for the Wiltshire Cycleway before cycling a lovely tree lined lane that reveals the magnificent Great Chalfield House owned and managed by the National Trust. Onwards towards Bradford on Avon passing a good cafe at Merkins. The road to Bradford on Avon is busy so be careful, but going this way s quite fast as you descend. Entering the town you do a big loop that takes you past the Moulton Factory and into the lovely centre crossing the River Avon on a narrow bridge. You finish very close to the Kennett and Avon Canal, but it is worth taking a diversion to the 14th century Tithe Barn where there are also some cafe's. This finishes the Wiltshire Cycleway
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